[SEMİNER] Innovate to Compete

Tarih: 27.03.2012
Yer: Boğaziçi Üniversitesi, Rektörlük Salonu

Prof. Georges Haour

      "INNOVATE TO COMPETE"

15:00 - 17:00

 

                         

Innovating is central to the success of technology companies.

CEOs of such companies must make their priority to ensure that technical know how is effectively converted into value. The paradox is that they rarely do.

Resolving the Innovation Paradox shows how the novel approach of distributed innovation puts innovation for profitable growth in the center of the CEO radar.

Thus, technology companies must first identify "high impact offerings" in an energetic process led by the CEO. Then, in an entrepreneuriaperspective, these companies develop the offerings by proactively tapping into external sources of technology, integrating them " seamlessly " with their own internal capabilities. Less constrained by their internal resources, such firms gain ineffectiveness, becoming architects of innovation. Using examples from companies such as Generics, Intel, Nokia and Samsung, Resolving the Innovation Paradox is primarily addressed to managers, but also to all readers interested in  innovation-led growth.

 

Our world of "hyper-competition" compels companies to regularly adapt their innovation process. It is argued that the latter, becoming more "open"

to the world outside the firm, increasingly requires  multi-actor innovation projects, following three trends.

 

The first trend is that firms must much better federate inputs from external actors, as described in the novel approach of distributed innovation. As an example, firms in the life-sciences sector have long partnered with external contributors: in their search of new molecules, they are thus increasingly architects of innovation. In particular, the external actors of universities must more effectively partner with companies. This transfer of knowledge and technology takes place via three channels: collaborative research, licensing and spinning out start ups. Drawing on the recent book From Science to Business, best practices are briefly discussed.

 

A second trend is the need to more effectively use electronic space, in order to better manage innovation, but also, through web-based platforms, to tap into talent and knowledge world-wide. The include innocentive, ninesigma and a host of other portals. SMEs-small and medium-size enterprises, in particular, must better benefit from this.

 

The third trend is that non-Asian firms must fully include China and India in their innovation system, as they represent sources of talent and innovations, not only for their large, dynamic markets, but also for the world. On the other hand, Chinese and Indian firms are rapidly including the "west" in their operations, including R&D activities. In particular, the external actors of universities must more effectively partner with companies. This transfer of knowledge and technology takes place via three channels: collaborative research, licensing and spinning out start ups. Drawing on the recent book From Science to Business, best practices are discussed.

 

Finally, characteristics of the "innovative firm" are described. The most effective ways are discussed for mitigating the normal  tendency of large firms towards bureaucracy, the ultimate enemy of an innovative spirits. Most critical to successful innovation is the human factor, i e high motivation and great talent of the staff.

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Dr. Georges Haour is Professor at the executive education institute IMD, Switzerland. He acts as adviser for companies on the management of R&D and innovation, entrepreneurship and new ventures, and the commercialisation of technology.

 

Born and raised in Lyon, France, he obtained a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Toronto, Canada. Prior to IMD, for nine years, he managed a 35 staff business unit at Battelle, in Geneva, carrying out innovation projects funded by corporations. Several of his innovations have been licensed, generating substantial new activities for the client companies. He has also been associated with the incubator-adviser firm Generics (now Sagentia), in Cambridge, UK.

 

He has eight patents and 110 publications. His most recent books include Resolving the Innovation Paradox, on the entrepreneurial, approach of distributed innovation (www.innovationparadox.com) and From Science to Business (Palgrave, London, 2011;www.sciencetobusiness.ch).     

Rectorate Conference Room

 27 March 2012

 15:00 - 17:00